torsdag, juli 12, 2018

Håkan Friman's publications

The Journal of International Criminal Justice has published a new issue with a  symposium dedicated to the life and work of Håkan Friman, Swedish Judge and one of the drafters of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. I made a list of Håkan Friman's publications that did not make it into the issue. You will find it below.

Håkan Friman – list of publications

1.    Selektiv distribution enligt EG:s konkurrensrätt, Stockholm, Juristförlaget, 1989
2.    ’Den nya svenska konkurrenslagen och begreppet ”relevant marknad” ’ with Ulf Djurberg, Svensk Juristtidning, 1994, 822–851.
3.    ’Modellag om gränsöverskridande  insolvensförfaranden’ Svensk Juristtidning, 1997, 736-755
4.    ‘UNCITRAL Model Law on Cross-Border Insolvency – An Introduction’. Paper based on a presentation at a Conference on UNCITRAL Instruments in the Southern Africa on 6 May 1999, Rand Afrikaans University, Johannesburg, South-Africa
5.    ‘International Criminal Court: Negotiations and Key Issues’, 8(6) African Security Review, 1999, 3-14
6.    ‘Rights of persons suspected or accused of a crime : International criminal law procedures’, in Lee, Roy S. (ed.), The International Criminal Court : The Making of the Rome Statute : Issues, Negotiations, Results, 247-261 (Kluwer Law International, 1999)
7.    ’The Rules of Procedure and Evidence of the International Criminal Court’ with Silvia A. Fernández de Gurmendi, 3 Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law, 2000, 289-336
8.    ‘Blaškić-saken’, 18(2) Mennesker & Rettigheter 2000, 126-134
9.    ‘Investigation and Prosecution’ in Lee, Roy S. (ed), The International Criminal Court – Elements of Crimes and Rules of Procedure and Evidence, 493-538 (Ardsley: Transnational Publishers, 2001)
10.    ‘The Democratic Republic of Congo: Justice in the aftermath of peace? ’, 10(3) African Security Review, 2001, 62-77
11.    ‘Todorović-saken’, 19(2) Mennesker & Rettigheter 2001, 137-147
12.    ‘Brđanin og Talić-saken’, 19(4) Mennesker & Rettigheter 2001, 137-142
13.    ‘Commentary on the sentencing Judgment, Prosecutor v. Todorović, T- Ch. 31 July 2001’, In André Klip (ed) The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia 2001, 795-804
14.    ‘Participation of Victims in the Proceedings’ with Gilbert Bitti in Lee, Roy S. (ed), The International Criminal Court – Elements of Crimes and Rules of Procedure and Evidence, 456-474 (Ardsley: Transnational Publishers, 2001)
15.    ‘Reparation to Victims’ with Peter Lewis in Lee, Roy S. (ed), The International Criminal Court – Elements of Crimes and Rules of Procedure and Evidence, 474-491 (Ardsley: Transnational Publishers, 2001)
16.    ‘Investigation and Prosecution’ in Lee, Roy S. (ed), The International Criminal Court – Elements of Crimes and Rules of Procedure and Evidence, 493-502 (Ardsley: Transnational Publishers, 2001)
17.    ‘Offences and Misconduct Against the Court’ in Lee, Roy S. (ed), The International Criminal Court – Elements of Crimes and Rules of Procedure and Evidence, 605-622 (Ardsley: Transnational Publishers, 2001)
18.    ‘The Rules of Procedure and Evidence in the Investigative Stage’ in Fischer, Horst, Kreß, Claus and Lüder, Sascha Rolf (eds), International and national prosecution of crimes under International Law: current developements (Berlin: Berliner Wissenschafts-Verlag, 2001)
19.    ‘Informal expert paper for the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court: “The principle of complementarity in practice” ’ with Xabier Agirre, Antonio Cassese, Rolf Einar Fife, Håkan Friman, Christopher Hall, John T. Holmes, Jann Kleffner, Hector Olasolo, Norul H. Rashid, Darryl Robinson, Elizabeth Wilmshurst and Andreas Zimmermann, ICC Office of the Prosecutor, 2003
20.    ‘Note regarding the European Union’s Regulation No 1346/2000 on Insolvency Proceedings’ University of Pretoria, 3 January 2003
21.    ‘Note regarding Cross-Border Insolvency’ University of Pretoria, 7 January 2003
22.    ‘Inspiration from the International Criminal Tribunals when Developing Law on Evidence for the International Criminal Court’, 2 The Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals 2003, 373-400
23.    ‘Procedural Law of Internationalized Criminal Courts’ with Nollkaemper, André and Kleffner, Jann K.,  in Romano, Cesare P. R. (ed), Internationalized Criminal Courts, 317-358 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004)
24.    ‘The Rules of Procedure and Evidence in the Investigative Stage’ in Fischer, Horst, Kreß, Claus and Lüder, Sascha Rolf (eds), International and national prosecution of crimes under International Law: current developements, 191-217 (Second Edition, Berlin: Berliner Wissenschafts-Verlag, 2004)
25.    ‘The International Criminal Court: Investigations into crimes committed in the DRC and Uganda. What is next?’ in African Security Review, 2004, 19-27
26.    ’The Rules of Procedure and Evidence of the International Criminal Court’ with Silvia A. Fernández de Gurmendi, in Bekou, Olympia and Cryer, Robert (eds), The International Criminal Court… (Ashgate/Dartmouth, 2004)
27.    ‘Institutional Framework of the ICC’ with Darryl Robinson in Commonwealth Secretariat, The Prosecution of International Crimes: A Practical Guide to Prosecuting ICC Crimes in Commonwealth States, 2005, 3-16
28.    ‘Sweden’ in Claus Kreß, Bruce Broomhall, Flavia Lattanzi and Valeria Santorui (eds) The Rome Statute and Domestic Legal Orders: Constitutional Issues, Cooperation and Enforcement, Baden-Baden: Nomos, 2005, 381-424
29.    ‘Political and Legal Considerations in Sweden Relating to the Rome Statute for the International Criminal Court’ in Lee, Roy S. (ed), States’ Responses to Issues Arising from the ICC Statute, Constitutional, Sovereignty, Judicial Cooperation and Criminal Law, 121-145 (Ardsley: Transnational Publishers, 2005)
30.    ‘Interlocutory Appeals In The Early Practice Of The International Criminal Court’, 2008 The Emerging Practice of the International Criminal Court, 553-562
31.    ‘Cooperation with the International Criminal Court: Some Thoughts on Improvements Under the Current Regime, in Politi, Mauro and Gioia, Federica (eds), The International Criminal Court and National Jurisdictions, 93-102 (Ashgate, 2008)
32.    An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure, with Robert Cryer, Darryl Robinson, Elizabeth Wilmshurst, (First Edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007)
33.    ‘The International Criminal Court and Participation of Victims: A Third Party to the Proceedings?’, 22 Leiden Journal of International Law 2009, 485-500
34.    ‘Participation of Victims in the ICC Criminal Proceedings and the Early Jurisprudence of the Court’ in Sluiter, Göran and Vasiliev, Sergey (eds), International Criminal Procedure Towards a Coherent Body of Law, 205-236 (London: Cameron May, 2009)
35.    ‘The Rules of Procedure and Evidence and Regulations of the Court’ with Silvia A. Fernández de Gurmendi, in: José Doria et al (eds.), The Legal Regime of the International Criminal Court: Essays in Honour of Professor Igor Blishchenko (Martinus Nijhoff, 2009)
36.    ‘Trying Cases at the International Criminal Tribunals in the Absence of the Accused?’, in Darcy, Shane and Powderly, Joseph (eds) Judicial creativity at the international Criminal Tribunals, 332-352, (Oxford Univ. Press, 2010)
37.    ‘International Criminal Procedures: Trial and Appeal Procedures’ in Schabas, William and Bernaz, Nadia (eds),  Routledge handbook of international criminal law, 271-287 (Routledge, 2010)
38.    An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure, with Robert Cryer, Darryl Robinson, Elizabeth Wilmshurst,  (Second Edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010)
39.    How to approach European Union Criminal Law: International Law, National Law, or Something in between?, in Law and justice: a strategy perspective, 261-270 (The Hague : Torkel Opsahl Academic EPublisher, 2012)
40.    ‘Charges’ with Helen Brady, Matteo Costi, Fabricio Guariglia, Carl Friedrich Stuckenberg, in Sluiter, Göran and others (eds), International Criminal Procedure: Principles and Rules (Oxford University Press, 2013)
41.    ‘International criminal procedure : principles and rules’ as editor with Göran Sluiter; Håkan Friman; Suzannah Linton; Sergey Vasiliev; & Salvatore Zappalà, (eds), (Oxford University Press, 2013)
42.    ‘Initiating Criminal Proceedings with Military Force: Some Legal Aspects of Policing Somali Pirates by Navies’, with Jens Lindborg in Modern Piracy Legal Challenges and Responses, Guilfoyle, Douglas (ed), 172-201 (Elgar, 2013)
43.    An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure, with Robert Cryer, Darryl Robinson, Elizabeth Wilmshurst, (Third Edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014)
44.    ‘Trial Procedures - with a Particular Focus on the Relationship between the Proceedings of the Pre-Trial and Trial Chambers’ in Carsten Stahn (ed) The Law and Practice of the International Criminal Court, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, 909-931
45.    Överlämnande enligt en europeisk eller nordisk arresteringsorder: en kommentar, with Ulf Wallentheim and Joakim Zetterstedt, Friman, Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer, 2016
46.    ’Article 75 Reparations to Victims” in Mark Klamberg (ed) Commentary on the Law of the ICC, (Brussels: TOAEP, 2017), 571-583
47.    ’Article 82 Appeal against other decisions” in Mark Klamberg (ed) Commentary on the Law of the ICC, (Brussels: TOAEP, 2017), 609-622

söndag, juni 17, 2018

Två intervjuer i DN

Jag har medverkat i två intervjuer i DN den 16 juni 2018 "Björn Söders (SD) utspel om samer och judar får stark kritik" och den 17 juni 2018 "Björn Söder står fast vid uttalande om minoriteter".

fredag, juni 15, 2018

Has the majority in the Bemba case treated circumstantial evidence with the logics that apply to hearsay evidence?

The Appeal Judgement in the Bemba case has resulted in a debate on several issues, including evaluation of evidence. I would like to highlight two paragraphs in the separate opinion of Judge Christine Van den Wyngaert and Judge Howard Morrison.

11. We are also concerned about the fact that the Trial Chamber relied on a large amount of circumstantial evidence in relation to a number of key findings. Again, the Trial Chamber stated the correct principle that circumstantial evidence can only lead to findings beyond a reasonable doubt when the proposed inference is the only plausible one, but has often failed to adhere to this principle in its actual analysis.  
12. For example, in paragraphs 676 to 684, the Conviction Decision lists eight circumstantial factors that it considered cumulatively proved the existence of a policy to attack a civilian population. We are far from persuaded that there was sufficient evidence to support the eight ‘factors’ that were relied upon. In this regard, it is sometimes argued that only the material facts must be established beyond a reasonable doubt and that it is unnecessary to establish subsidiary facts to the same standard.7 While this is legally correct, it does not mean that the quality of the evidence for subsidiary facts is irrelevant from an evidentiary point of view. This is especially true in relation to circumstantial evidence. By definition, drawing inferences from circumstantial evidence only adds uncertainty. Therefore, if the factual basis of the circumstantial evidence is weak, the inferences drawn from it will be even weaker.
I have a problem especially with the last sentence which is arguably wrong: "if the factual basis of the circumstantial evidence is weak, the inferences drawn from it will be even weaker."

To the contrary, even if separate pieces of evidence are too weak by themselves to prove guilt, the combined evidentiary value will be stronger than any of the individual pieces if the pieces of evidence are independent and seek to prove the same fact in issue. These logics apply to circumstantial evidence which is a form of concurrent (corroborative) evidence. The opposite logics apply to successive (chain) evidence, all pieces of evidence in a chain that are less than certain will have the result that the combined inference will be even weaker. Hearsay is an example of this. From the paragraph above it appears as the judges in the majority erroneously have applied the logics of successive evidence when evaluating circumstantial evidence (concurrent evidence). In other words, has the majority in the Bemba case treated circumstantial evidence with the logics that apply to hearsay evidence?

I have written about this in my book Evidence in International Criminal Trials (2013), pages 177-179 and more recently in the article The Alternative HypothesisApproach, Robustness and International Criminal Justice (2015). Let us compare successive (chain) evidence and concurrent (corroborative) evidence while leaving counterevidence aside.

First, successive (chain) evidence concerns evidentiary facts that each are links in a chain. The links all have a probative value that is less than certain, which will have the result that the combined evidentiary weight can never be higher than the evidentiary value of the weakest link. The rule of thumb, or cautionary advice, is that successive evidence is often overestimated because the focus of the evaluation of evidence tends to be towards the last link of the chain neglecting the previous links. This is the reason why the evidentiary value of hearsay evidence (which is a form of successive evidence) tends to be weaker than direct evidence. International judges appear to be aware of this danger. The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY)Appeals Chamber has in Aleksovski and Kordic and Cerkez listed indicia of reliability for hearsay evidence where of one indicia is whether it is ‘first-hand or removed’. This approach has been repeated at the ICTY and at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) and International Criminal Court (ICC); case law suggests that hearsay evidence normally should be afforded less probative value or weight.
Secondly, counterevidence…  

Thirdly, concurrent (corroborative) evidence concerns two or more independent pieces of evidence that concurs and separately has a probative value supporting the fact in issue. An example would be two witnesses that observe the same event independently of each other. The probative value in such cases may be higher than the highest probative value of any of the separate pieces of evidence, which [at a first glance] may appear illogical. The rule of thumb is thus that in cases of concurrent evidence the weight is, according to Ekelöf, often higher than what is normally expected. With a similar logic, judges at the ICTR and ICC have declared that they attach higher probative value to those parts of a testimony which may be corroborated;  
Klamberg, The Alternative Hypothesis Approach, Robustness and International Criminal Justice (2015), pages 540-541
I dont have a problem with what  Judge Christine Van den Wyngaert and Judge Howard Morrison write about [alternative] plausible explanations in para. 14, it fits very well with my take on evaluating evidence. It is just another part in the process.

tisdag, juni 12, 2018

Frågor väcks om det undertecknade dokumentet

Jag har gett kommentar till TT/Aftonbladet 12 juni 2018 angående Trumps och Kims gemensamma uttalande: "Frågor väcks om det undertecknade dokumentet".

torsdag, december 21, 2017

Jugoslaviendomstol sätter punkt med Mladic

Jag blev intervjuad i Sydsvenskan 21 november 2017 om "Jugoslaviendomstol sätter punkt med Mladic"

fredag, november 03, 2017

Krönika i UNT

Jag har skrivit krönika i UNT på temat datalagring: "Sverige måste övertyga EU-domstolen", 3 november 2017.

måndag, oktober 23, 2017

Intervju med undertecknad i DN om gripna IS-svenskar

Jag är intervjuad i DN om gripna IS-svenskar.

måndag, oktober 16, 2017

Datalagring och effektivitet

Jag har efterlyst att datalagringens effektivitet utvärderas-jag tror själv att datalagring är effektivt och nödvändigt men saken bör likväl prövas empiriskt.

I SOU 2017:75 ägnas kapitel 7 åt denna fråga. Inledningsvis finns en hänvisning till EU-kommissionens utvärdering från 2011. När denna utvärdering presenterades ansåg jag att den endast innehöll anekdotiska exempel (se avsnitt 5.4 i utvärderingen och min kommentar från 2011) och ingen systematisk utvärdering, jag håller fast vid den uppfattningen. Även SOU 20175:75 innehåller exempel, se sid. 122-125. Den tyska frivilligorganisationen Vorratsdatenspeicherung har 2011 gjort en kvantitativ studie som visar att datalagring inte är effektiv, studien visar lägre uppklarningsprocent av allvarliga brott efter att lagstiftning om datalagring infördes. Samtidigt finns det metodologiska brister i denna studie då korrelation inte är det samma som kausalitet.

Det är bra att exempel från verkliga utredningar och underrättelseoperationer används, men jag tror det vore bra med en vetenskaplig studie, gärna med systematisk och empirisk metodik som kombinerar vad Combs (kvantitativ metod) och  McDermott (kvalitativ metod) har gjort. Jag har skrivit ett bokkapitel där jag diskuterar styrkorna och svagheterna i deras respektive metod, jag argumenterar för att de båda kan användas stegvis: först kvantitativ studie av allt tillgängligt material, därefter kvalitativ studie av det urval av fall som trillar ut från den kvantitativa studien. EU-kommissionen och den svenska datalagringsutredningen har bara gjort det senare och jag undrar hur urvalet av exempel har skett. Min text publiceras 2018.

tisdag, september 19, 2017

Medverkar i Fråga Lund

Jag har varit med i SVTs "Fråga Lund" 19 september 2017, 12.20 från slutet.

tisdag, augusti 15, 2017

Intervju om att USA spårar användare av Trumpkritisk sajt

Jag är intervjuad av SR P1 Ekot om "USA spårar användare av Trumpkritisk sajt", 15 augusti 2017.

onsdag, augusti 02, 2017

Krigsfångestatus för gripna IS-svenskar?

Jag blev igår intervjuad av TT om gripna IS-svenskar, se Aftonbladets artikel "Oklart hur Sverige ser på gripna IS-svenskar". Jag säger i artikeln bl.a. "Krigsfångar är en juridisk term som bara är tillämplig i krig mellan stater, vilket gör att gripna IS-anhängare ur juridisk synvinkel inte kan vara krigsfångar."

En kollega på annan institution undrar över mitt påstående och menar att personer som strider för icke-statlig aktör i ett inbördeskrig visst kan tillerkännas krigsfångestatus. Jag skrev ett ganska långt svar till min kollega och när jag nu lagt tid på det, lägger jag upp mitt svar så fler kan ta del av det. Det är ej i syfte att hänga ut min kollega, det är en intressant fråga som han ställer. Se nedan. Mitt svar kan även ha bäring på diskussionen vad man ska kalla personer som rest till Syrien för att slåss, är de IS-krigare eller IS-terrorister? Jag skulle kalla dem "IS-stridande" vilket saknar den positiva/negativa värdeladdning som orden krigare/terrorist har, vidare är "stridande" ett ord som särskiljer dessa personer från kombatanter. Kombatantstatus medför flera rättigheter som IS-stridande inte har, vilket jag förklarar nedan, därför bör termen "kombatant" ej användas för att benämna dessa personer.

Hej,
Det stämmer att artikel 3 även skyddar tillfångatagna IS-stridande, men inte ikraft av att de är krigsfångar – artikel 3 skyddar alla personer, civila såväl som stridande.  

Om du tänker på artikel 4(2) i tredje Genevekonventionen så bör det framhållas att nämnda konvention bara gäller i en internationell väpnad konflikt (däremot gäller artikel 3 även i en icke-internationell väpnad konflikt). Krigsfångestatus tillerkänns inte i en icke-internationell väpnad konflikt.  

Artikel 4(2) handlar om icke-reguljära förband (milis och friivilliga) som strider för en part - och med part avses en stat – mot en annan stat.


Varken Gemensamma artikel 3 i de fyra Genèvekonventionerna eller tilläggsprotokoll II som gäller i icke-internationell väpnad konflikt använder termen krigsfånge – det är avsiktligt från staterna som tagit fram konventionerna, de vill ej ge sådan status till icke-statliga aktörer i ett inbördeskrig.  

För att backa upp med ytterligare källor har jag med anledning av din fråga plockat fram de fyra första böckerna jag fann i min hylla (varav en av dessa böcker innehåll två relevanta texter).

Sivakumaran, The Law of Non-Internaional Armed Conflict, Oxford University Press, 2012, sid. 521: “As with combatant immunity, no mention of prisoners of war is to be found in the law of non-international armed conflict. However, there is an important distinction between prisoner of war status and treatment of individuals as prisoners of war. Members of the military wing of the non-state armed group (fighters) who are captured do not benefit from prisoner of war status as a matter of law.”

Ove Bring, Folkrätt för totalförsvaret: en handbok, Norstedts, 2002, sid. 103 ”Motståndsrörelse kan också förekomma vid interna konflikter men då gäller inte här angivna regler”.

Gary D. Solis, The Law of Armed Conflict, Cambridge University Press, 2016, sid. 110, 205, 211: “One should also note that, since prisoners of war status derives in principle from the lawfulness of combatancy (GC III, Article 4.A (2)), ‘there is no POW status in non-international armed conflicts.’ How does one refer to prisoners held in noninternational armed conflicts? As detainees or, simply, prisoners. That there are no POWs in internal conflicts is a position unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. …What about common Article 3 non-international armed conflicts? The traditional view is that, just as there are POWs in non-international armed conflicts, there are no ‘combatants’, lawful or otherwise, in common Article 3 conflicts. There may be combat in the literal sense, but in terms of LOAC there are fighters, rebels, insurgents, or guerillas who engage in armed conflict, and there are government forces, and perhaps armed forces allied to the government forces. There are no combatants as that term is used in customary law of war, however. Upon capture such fighters are simply prisoners of the detaining government; they are criminal to be prosecuted for their unlawful acts, either by a military court or under the domestic law of the capturing state. …In a common Article 2 conflict, an individual may not form an independent group of fighter to fight for their own cause or goals, unassociated with either of the states opposing each other in the conflict. Private citizens and independent armed groups have always been excluded from entitlement to the combatant’s privilege and POW status.”  
Sean Watts, Who is a Prisoner of War? i Clapham, Gaeta och Sassoli (red) The 1949 Geneva Conventions: A Commentary, Oxford University Press, 2015, sid. 897: “[B]elonging to a Party to the conflict is perhaps the least appreciated condition of article 4(A)(2). … Thus armed conflict, no matter its intensity or duration, between groups not belonging to states parties to the Conventions can never implicate the POW status provisions of GC III”  
Laura M. Olson, Status and Treament of Those Who do not Fulfil the Conditions for Statuts as Prisoners of War, i Clapham, Gaeta och Sassoli (red) The 1949 Geneva Conventions: A Commentary, Oxford University Press, 2015, sid. 933: “Unlike in IAC, the IHL provisions of NIAC protecting persons in the hands of the enemy are not set out according to protected person categories, such as POWs or civilians. Furthermore, IHL of NIACs ‘foresees no combatant status, does not defines combatants and does prescribe specific obligations for them’, as states did not wish to confer the right to participate in hostilities and its ensuing combatant immunity on non-state actors in NIACs.”


Vänligen Mark
Uppdatering, mail nr 2.

Hej,
Jag svarade inte på den del där du nämner artikel 4(3).  
Denna bestämmelse tar bl.a. sikte på en situation där en stat har ockuperat en annan stat och bytt ut regeringen i den senare staten. Personer som slåss mot den ockuperande staten till förmån för den tidigare regeringen ska då tillerkännas krigsfångestatus. Situationen man tänkte på var fransmännen ledda av De Gaulle som slogs mot Nazi-Tyskland. Nazi-Tyskland erkända förvisso inte Gaulles befrielsekommittee men tillfångatagna fransmän tillerkändes likväl krigsfångestatus.  
Se kommentar av Sean Watts, Who is a Prisoner of War? i Clapham, Gaeta och Sassoli (red) The 1949 Geneva Conventions: A Commentary, Oxford University Press, 2015, sid. 907.  
Artikel 4(3) gäller under internationell väpnad konflikt mellan stater, bestämmelsen tar sikte på icke erkänd regering som är något annat än icke erkänd stat. IS gör inte anspråk på att vilja ersätta Syriens regering eller att de är Syriens regering, de tycks göra anspråk på territorium med andra gränser och annan befolkning (stora delar av Mellanöstern)  
Vänligen Mark

onsdag, mars 29, 2017

Två frågor med anledning av morden på Zaida Catalán, Michael Sharp and Betu Tshintel

Med viss tvekan skriver jag detta inlägg då jag inser att många nu sörjer Zaida Catalán. Likväl tycker jag följande två frågor bör ställas med anledning av hennes död.

1. Zaida Catalán utredde med sin kollega krigsförbrytelser i DRC (Kongo-Kinshasa) som kan ha utförts av regeringen. Internationella brottmålsdomstolen genomför sedan drygt 10 år formella brottsutrredningar i DRC. Rättegångar gentemot tre personer är slutförda och en rättegång pågår, samtliga rör rebeller. Varför har inte ICC inlett formella utredningar beträffande påstådda brott av regeringen? Varför utförs utredningar beträffande regeringen av FN-experter (som säkert är duktiga, men de är inte nödvändigtvis skolade brottsutredare) när ICC har jurisdiktion över påstådda krigsförbrytelser i DRC? Jag inser att det kan handla om realpolitik från ICCs sida, men då uppstår frågan vad ICC och stater - inklusive Sverige - gör för att möta denna realpolitik.

2. När nu ICC har jurisidiktion, vore det inte läge för domstolen att utreda om morden av Zaida Catalán, Michael Sharp and Betu Tshintel är krigsförbrytelser? Attacker mot personal som är inblandade i humanitära insatser eller fredsbevarande styrkor i samband med väpnad konflikt (i detta fall inbördeskrig) är krigsförbrytelser enligt Romstadgan för ICC, artikcle 8(2)(e)(iii), läs mer här. Huruvida Zaida Catalán, Michael Sharp and Betu Tshintel var personal i en "humanitär insats" är jag lite osäker om, men saken förtjänar att prövas.